Will Paint Fix It? Sisu Tips on What to Expect

Will Paint Fix It? Sisu Tips on What to Expect

Home Painting Interior Painting

Painting always comes with a unique set of challenges for each client. Things that weren’t apparent before painting become visible once we’ve started and customer expectations can be unrealistic. I get it. You’ve paid god knows how much for this interior paint job and darn well expect it to look exactly like you’ve dreamed it would. We want the same thing! Not only are you our customer, you are our lifeline–the people who keep us afloat in this crazy world. We love you and want the best for you! Unfortunately, there are some things that a good paint job just won’t fix.

Got cracks, holes, or texture that looks like the rough side of a bad day?

As much as paint can transform a space in an amazing way, it will not fix all your wall issues. If there’s a visible structural defect before you paint, chances are good it will still be noticeable after you paint. Structural defects can be sneaky, only showing their ugly faces once the wallpaper is off or the furniture is out of the room. Sometimes they’re obvious from the get-go. If your painter claims he can fix the waves, cracks or holes in your walls using paint, he’s probably lying to you. If you’re working with us, we’ll let you know as soon as we find any issues.

 Woeful Woodwork

Trim, baseboards and door casings all tend to suffer from woodwork neglect. Years of wear and tear can leave them looking rough and dinged up. Moisture damage on exposed wood can cause raised grain. As a professional painting company, we know a couple of tricks of the trade that can give you beautiful results. We’ll sand, fill with Bondo or wood filler, use PeelBond or TrimMagic, prime and do anything else we can think of to improve the finish of your wood. Paint will protect and clean up your woodwork. It won’t fix any flaws inherent in the substrate. Additionally, if you find dry rot anywhere, don’t paint over it! Dry rot needs to be removed and the wood replaced by a professional. Hiding the problem won’t help in the long run.

Terrible Texture

Once we landed a job repainting ceilings. It would have been straight forward enough, except for the fact that the homeowner’s main motivating factor for painting was more complicated than a tired color. The texture was peeling off! We looked closer at the damaged area and were amazed that the texture and drywall were not primed. That may not mean anything to you, but to us it was apparent that this was going to be a huge issue. Due to the lack of primer, any paint or texture we applied would just fall off again. We explained to the homeowners that this was a pre-existing condition (something we hadn’t accounted for in the scope of work and couldn’t guarantee in the long run).

As with all of our clients, we did everything in our power to resolve the issue. We called in a drywaller to repair the places where the texture had failed. When they were done, we sprayed the ceilings with an oil-based Z-Prime coat which we let dry overnight. The primer sealed the texture so that we could paint without re-damaging it. When we painted, we used two coats of paint applied with an airless sprayer, making sure not to back roll so the texture wouldn’t be damaged. The results were miraculous (if I do say so myself) and our efforts probably saved the customer thousands of dollars! The moral of the story? Just because paint can’t fix your texture doesn’t mean that it can’t be fixed by a painting pro and a fantastic drywaller.

 Revolting Repairs

We’ve been called in to right the wrongs of other contractors. Shoddy wall repairs can ruin the feel of your whole space and leave you feeling jaded towards contractors generally. First, we’d like to apologize to anyone who’s ever been of a victim of this type of disservice! How terrible, to put your home and your money on the line and have results which are less than pleasing! You have all of our sympathy. Secondly, there is a glimmer of hope. Although sometimes these repairs can be too time consuming to fix (a nice way of saying too expensive) and outside of the services we offer, painting can still perk up your space.

For everything else there’s spackle and caulk. Minor holes and slight cracks can be filled in using one of these two products, but they aren’t guaranteed to succeed. Proper prep work should include fixing what can be fixed and letting you, the customer, know about everything else. Sometimes, there’s nothing to do but call a drywaller. If you have any doubts about your space and its inherent flaws call us, email us, or tweet us! We are happy to help.

 

House Painting in Wet Weather – When is it Safe?

House Painting in Wet Weather – When is it Safe?

Exterior Painting Home Painting

Weather can affect exterior house painting and the Pacific Northwest has its challenges. You may already realize that our greatest threat is moisture.

Let’s address the obvious questions:

Can you paint exteriors in rainy weather?

The answer is a resounding “NO!” If your contractor is telling you they have a method for painting exteriors when it’s raining, I would be very skeptical. The only safe way to paint in the rain is to have the areas completely covered and not in danger of taking on any moisture. That means, for most exteriors, you would need a giant plastic enclosure protecting your home. This is a spendy undertaking.

Unscrupulous painting contractors “red-eye” their paint so that it will dry quicker. This is a bad practice, because it voids the manufacturer warranty. Red-eying the paint comprises solvent-based additives that flash off quickly and cause the paint to dry at an accelerated rate. I suggest you tell your painter to hit the road if they try to use this method.

Switching to oil-based paint during a rainy stretch is another practice which is frowned upon. New construction runs year-round, so painters may switch the gutter and/or trim paint to oil-based paint because it skims over and won’t rain off nearly as easily as their preferred water-based counterparts. The problem is that oil-based paints do not hold up to the elements and will crack and peel off the gutters. We’ve cleaned up a lot of gutters because of this problem, and sheesh, what a mess! To be fair, when there’s a deadline to meet and the general contractor is on your back and the buyers need to get moved into their home, painters aren’t left with a whole lot of options. As they say, the show must go on. But, with repaints, there shouldn’t be such pressure, so there’s no reason to rush and deliver anything but a proper paint job.

How soon can it rain after a paint job?

This answer varies with humidity, dew point, temperature, wind, paint color and the product that is used. Under normal circumstance, most paints can withstand a shower or two after about 4 hours of drying time. The gutters are at the highest risk for issues because they are the most exposed. The water collects on the top rim of the gutter, runs down the front edge and then collects in big drips underneath on the bottom of the gutters. If the paint hasn’t had sufficient time to dry, this can turn into one ugly mess! If this happens, the best solution is to wait till weather clears then repaint.

High humidity, dark colorants, cool temperatures and reaching the dew point all slow up the drying time. Wind and warm temperatures speed up the drying time. Heat and air movement are critical for the paint to dry.

The dew point will affect the drying time the most. The temperature needs to be at least 5 degrees above the dew point in order for the paint to dry properly. The dew point is the point when moisture appears on surfaces. Unfortunately, if the paint gets wet from dew, it delays the drying process and can cause problems.

What’s the preferred air temperature for painting?

It’d sure be nice if it was sunny and 72 degrees with just a hint of a breeze every day, because then we wouldn’t have to worry about the weather. But, that’s unrealistic, so we’ve had to rely on the drying agents in paint to help us extend our season. Otherwise, there’d only be about three optimal days to paint in Oregon!

When it comes to painting, I am more concerned about the dew point than the temperature because most exterior paints are rated to 35 degrees. If the paint re-wets from the dew, it can ruin a perfectly good paint job.

If you must paint during the off season, a good rule of thumb to follow is to apply paint with an airless sprayer between the hours of 10 am to 2 pm. This way you are starting late enough for the air temperature to raise a bit and stopping to give the paint plenty of time to dry before nightfall.

If, while you are painting, the weather turns on you, take a deep breath, stay calm and think your options through. First, stop painting immediately. Second, check your work site to see if there is any wet paint that is in danger of raining off. If the paint has skimmed over, you may be okay. If you find areas that are washing off, try to find a way to protect those areas, such as draping plastic to provide a cover. If that’s not possible, you may have to let Mother Nature follow course and deal with a mess later. If paint starts raining off your house, try your best not to let it dry out once the rain subsides. If you get to the paint while it’s still wet, flushing the areas with plenty of water will dilute the wet paint and make for a much easier time of cleaning. This is where a pressure washer comes in handy, especially if the paint is dripping onto surrounding surfaces, such as concrete or the roof.

If the paint has cured to the point that it won’t wash off easily, you best run to the paint store for help. There are products, such as Krud Kutter that are made to remove dried latex paint. Just be sure to read and follow the instructions of the label.

And, most importantly, r-e-l-a-x. A paint disaster really is a miniscule problem in the grand scheme of things. As with most problems in life, there is a solution. A glass of wine won’t hurt either. If you’ve done your due diligence and hired a reputable painter, then trust your painter to take care of weather related issues. Weather is unpredictable, so there is no fool proof way to completely avoid Mother Nature’s wrath.

Bottom line – whether you hire a painting company to complete the job or you choose to do-it-yourself, I recommend waiting out inclement weather to help you achieve the spectacular results you hoping to achieve.

Wishing you a happy, sunny day!

Nancy

How To: Wall Repairs for Holes Smaller Than A Fist

How To: Wall Repairs for Holes Smaller Than A Fist

Home Painting Interior Painting Uncategorized

Drywall is not the strongest substrate in the planet.  In fact, without much effort or completely by accident, it’s easy to put an unsightly hole in a wall.  Drywall damage often happens during picture-hanging, due to an accidental drop of a heavy object, or the occasional hole-punching teen tantrum.  Believe me; I’ve seen it all…

The good news is, small drywall holes are quite easy to repair!  Just follow these simple instructions:

Repairing nail or screw holes – flush fill the hole:

Simply dab a little lightweight spackle on your index fingers to fill the hole, wiping any excess away with your finger or a light cloth.  No need for putty knives and sanding.  Keep it simple and it’ll blend quite well with your orange peel texture.  If the edges of the holes have flared out from the fastener that you removed, you may want to knock down these edges with your putty knife before you fill.  Smooth walls can be a little more finicky, so you may need to sand it smooth after proper drying time.  With small holes like this, less is better.  We see a lot mistakes when homeowners overdo the putty, which usually creates more work later.

For larger holes that require patching – gather these commonly available items:

  1. Putty knife – size depends on the size of the hole you are repairing
  2. Yellow fiberglass drywall mesh tape – self adhesive
  3. Drywall mud – 20 minute mud will work just fine
  4. Utility blade (snap knife works great)
  5. Sponge
  6. Rattle can texture for textured walls – I recommend Homax Oil Based Wall Texture for Orange Peel; they also have one for knock down, but most walls have an orange peel texture.
  7. Primer – water based wall primer will be sufficient
  8. Touch up paint
  9. Paint brush/roller and frame

Here are the steps for repairing the hole:

  1. Trim back the drywall paper about a quarter to half inch around the perimeter of the hole.  The drywall paper will peel off the drywall after you score it, exposing the bare drywall.
  2. Apply strips of dry wall mesh over the hole to cover the hole; overlapping the strips of mesh and attaching it to the exposed drywall, then trim the excess off with your blade so that the edges of the yellow tape do not overlap onto the textured parts of the wall.  This gives you a base to apply the drywall  mud so you don’t need to patch in with a piece of drywall
  3. Apply the drywall mud over the top of the yellow tape with your putty knife, gradually building it up to create a smooth surface; “feather it out” over the edges onto the textured wall to create uniform converage
  4. Allow the drywall mud to firm up, but not completely set (about 10-15 minutes)
  5. Take a wet sponge and start working the drywall mud in a circular motion, keeping the sponge wet at all times to smooth out the drywall patch.  Be patient and work slowly.  It will create lather as you gradually smooth out the patch
  6. Once the patch is smooth and flush, clean out your sponge and wipe the patch clean
  7. Allow the patch to finish drying
  8. Apply a coat of primer with a brush or roller and allow to dry
  9. Warm your rattle can texture under water to build pressure and shake the can for a full two minutes – DO NOT SKIMP ON THIS STEP
  10. Practice spraying on a piece of cardboard or paper.  When you are spraying, spray in a continuous, circular motion
  11. Adjust the nozzle till the spray pattern matches the wall
  12. Spray the texture as you practiced.  Do not over apply the texture.  This only takes a few seconds.  It’s better to spray too little than too much, because you can always add more13.Allow to dry 5 or so minutes, then apply the final coat of primer
  13. After the primer is dry, apply the touch up paint

If you follow these steps, you can repair a hole in the wall in just a couple of hours.  If you have trouble with the wet sanding step, you can allow the patch to completely dry and use drywall screens to sand it down. This creates dust, so we prefer to wet sand.

I hope these directions will help you achieve great results!  Let us know how your project turns out.

Best regards,

Nancy

Metamerism – The Metamorphosis Of Color

Metamerism – The Metamorphosis Of Color

Home Contractors Home Painting Interior Painting

Have you ever chosen the perfect color for your walls at the paint store, only to get home and find that it looks like a completely different color? How about pairing up a paint color to a pillow or other item only to discover it doesn’t match at all once the paint is up on the wall. Or, maybe you painted a room and one of the walls looks like it was painted a different color? All these scenarios are most likely caused by a phenomenon called metamerism.

Following is Wikipedia’s definition of metamerism: In colorimetry, metamerism is the matching of the apparent color of objects without matching the spectral power distributions. Colors that match this way are called metamers.

In the painting world, metamerism describes the effect that light has on color that results in changes to the appearance. If you take a board with paint on it and move it around the room, lay it down or hold it up over your head, the color will change, depending on how the lighting is hitting it. If you leave the board in one spot, you can watch the color change throughout the day as the sun rises and sets.

Metamerism can make choosing a color for your room a challenge. The color might be exactly what you are looking for at 2:32 p.m., but as the sun moves and lighting changes, it may turn drab or go a little too bright. A world without metamerism would be boring and flat, so I appreciate metamers. I enjoy the variations in colors that occur because of lighting.

Most commonly, we run into trouble when we take a paint color and change the sheens. Sheen refers to how flat or shiny the paint is. There are a myriad of sheens, but the most common are flat, eggshell, satin, semi-gloss and high gloss. We generally choose a color based on a paint chip, which is made of ink. Then we choose a sheen and that changes how much light the paint will absorb or reflect. This sheen variation can make it look like the color is different or wrong, when in fact, it is a spot on match.

I hope you have enjoyed this lesson in metamerism and that it helps you to appreciate the ever changing colorful world around us.

Until next time!

Nancy