Tips for Choosing Exterior Paint Colors

Tips for Choosing Exterior Paint Colors

Exterior Painting Home Painting Paint color

I love this time of year! The sun is shining, the neighbors are barbecuing and I’m doing what I love best – helping clients choose colors for their homes. With every paint contract, I offer a complimentary color consultation. I have to admit this is the part of my job that I enjoy the most. It gives me a little extra time to build a relationship with my clients. And, I learned early on that no matter how expertly we’ve applied the paint, the client gets the most enjoyment when the color is perfectly suited to their taste and lifestyle.

Along the way, I’ve learned some tried and true tips for choosing exterior paint colors. Here we go…

Be a pioneer – think outside the box

Occasionally, I check in on the big-name painting sites to see what they’re saying about the latest color trends. On one such recent visit, I read some really poor advice: consider your neighbor’s house and make sure your color selection doesn’t clash.

I couldn’t disagree more! In my experience, when the time comes to update your exterior paint colors, chances are the majority of homes in the neighborhood are also using outdated colors. Painting provides a great opportunity to make a bold move and bring in some contemporary colors… or select a color scheme that you just love, regardless of what the neighbors are up to.  Don’t let the fact that so many people choose run-of-the-mill beige stop you from moving into a more interesting or vibrant palette. With a little guidance and reassurance, we can bring in an improved palette with current colors to set a new and refreshing trend in the neighborhood.  Chances are, the neighbors will appreciate it as much as you do!

How to choose colors – look for inspiration – it’s all around you

Does the house have a brick or stone facade? Consider the landscaping features and the roof color. Look at pictures in magazines, online or in brochures provided by the paint stores; these are great resources for paint colors. I often ask my clients to take pictures of houses they like when they are out and about. The Houzz.com website is another great place to collect ideas and inspiration.

When choosing exterior colors go darker – don’t be afraid

Natural lighting washes out color, so you can hardly go wrong by going darker. I can’t remember a client ever saying they wish they had chosen a lighter color, but I’ve heard many remarks about wishing for a darker palate. When selecting colors, even in the darker palettes, it pays to consult with a professional who understands which colors are best with regard to fading.

 Add emphasis and accent to your exterior

The house will look bigger if the garage door is painted the same color as the main color on the house. This strategy works great, unless you have a custom, fancy garage door that is a beautiful accent all by itself.

 Give your front door a pop of color

I love red doors; they are just so Portland!

Black doors are classic, but there’s risk of blistering if the door gets too many hours of full sun. There is an endless selection of fun colors and palettes to match or compliment your house color, which can create a unique and beautiful focal point.

 A little is enough – don’t overdo

It’s tempting to add splashes of color here, there and everywhere, but this approach is only really effective with certain architectural styles such as Victorian, craftsman or bungalow. The most common and best combination for most homes is 1) a base color, 2) a trim color and 3) a door accent color.Exterior of house showing base color, trim color, and front door color

When in doubt, call in a professional to consult. Most of all, remember that the colors you choose say a lot about you… so don’t be afraid to let your style and preferences show!

You never need to go it alone. Give me a call and I’ll bring my color swatches over.

 

Until next time,

Nancy

Mistakes House Painters Make – Common Causes

Mistakes House Painters Make – Common Causes

Exterior Painting Home Painting Interior Painting

Mistakes can be made on house painting projects, whether you are tackling the paint job yourself or you’ve hired a professional. First, let me state clearly, errors are made by hard working painters and homeowners alike and most can be corrected. Sometimes things are missed because of oversight, other times there are issues that aren’t apparent until the job is done. Here are four of the most common glaring issues.

The lines aren’t straight. 

Painting is a skilled trade and I’ve seen painters with 20 years of experience that still haven’t learned to paint a straight line. There’s also an art to taping off. If you’ve ever painted for yourself, you know the frustration of the paint bleeding underneath the tape. The solution is to hire a professional to repaint the straight lines. Choose a company that has a great reputation for clean lines and you won’t be disappointed. The simple act of straightening up the lines can make a night and day difference on how your final product looks.

The paint is peeling.

The three prevalent reasons that paint peels are: inter-coat adhesion failure, moisture, and lack of appropriate prep or primer. Let’s look at these in more depth:

  • Inter-coat Adhesion is caused by two paint products not bonding. Most of you have heard that you cannot apply latex paint over oil without the proper prep. If waterborne paint is applied directly to oil-based paint without sanding and/or the correct primer, it will peel. If you apply a low sheen over a glossy paint without sanding, it will peel. When the paint doesn’t bond, it peels off easily. Inter-coat adhesion failure can be time consuming and expensive to fix. Sometimes a light sanding and bonding primer applied with a high-quality paint will correct the issue; however, in the worst case, the paint will need to be completely stripped.
  • Moistureif paint is bubbling and blistering, then moisture is most likely the cause. This is very common with older siding. You may not see moisture, but condensation in the substrate can cause the paint to blister and peel. Also, moisture intrusion in the house or places that are not properly ventilated can create issues with paint. Paint will not fix a moisture problem; the cause of the moisture needs to be addressed. Once you have fixed the root of the problem, then a good primer and two coats of quality paint will take care of the paint failure.
  • Lack of appropriate primer can cause problems. You could be dealing with the paint not properly adhering to the substrate, inter-coat adhesion, and/or tannin bleed. Mistakes like applying paint to bare wood will make the paint not stick. Most wood requires an oil-based primer. MDF (medium-density fiberboard) requires an oil-based primer as well. If you prime MDF with a water-based primer, you will have moisture issues because the water in the primer will penetrate the substrate. If you have a glossy surface, then I recommend a bonding primer. Also, cedar and other wood products require an oil-based primer to block the tannins. Tannic acids are the oils that bleed out of certain woods, especially cedar, mahogany, redwood, fir, and pine. They cause a yellowish-brown stain in the paint, more prominent with light colors.

There are paint drips and splatters.

Nothing is more frustrating than cleaning up these from a freshly finished paint job. It doesn’t take long for paint to dry and you may never fully remove the paint, if it lands on certain fabrics and belongings. Once, we were hired to take over a paint job because the previous painters didn’t cover anything and got paint on the homeowner’s antique cello. While painting, mistakes can happen, you should NEVER have paint slopped on your surroundings because someone didn’t take the time to tape off and cover everything. Avoid the worries of having to clean up dried paint by making sure EVERYTHING is covered with plastic, paper and drop cloths. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Lack of prep isn’t pretty.

painting prep, mistakes, common causesIf the surface you are painting isn’t properly prepped, all sorts of problems can ensue. Prep work includes cleaning the surfaces, sanding, caulking, filling holes, wall repairs, primer, and taping among other various steps required for a fine finish. These can be tedious, time consuming and cost extra labor; or they may cut into your personal time, if you are attacking the project yourself. But, if you are anything like me and appreciate a beautiful paint job that lasts then it’s worth the extra effort or expense to have the job done right the first time. My advice? Mistakes are less likely to happen, if you don’t skimp on prep work!

If you’ve found yourself at the end of a paint job and you aren’t satisfied with the workmanship, you may need a professional opinion. As always, we are only a phone call away!

Happy painting!

Nancy

House Painting in Wet Weather – When is it Safe?

House Painting in Wet Weather – When is it Safe?

Exterior Painting Home Painting

Weather can affect exterior house painting and the Pacific Northwest has its challenges. You may already realize that our greatest threat is moisture.

Let’s address the obvious questions:

Can you paint exteriors in rainy weather?

The answer is a resounding “NO!” If your contractor is telling you they have a method for painting exteriors when it’s raining, I would be very skeptical. The only safe way to paint in the rain is to have the areas completely covered and not in danger of taking on any moisture. That means, for most exteriors, you would need a giant plastic enclosure protecting your home. This is a spendy undertaking.

Unscrupulous painting contractors “red-eye” their paint so that it will dry quicker. This is a bad practice, because it voids the manufacturer warranty. Red-eying the paint comprises solvent-based additives that flash off quickly and cause the paint to dry at an accelerated rate. I suggest you tell your painter to hit the road if they try to use this method.

Switching to oil-based paint during a rainy stretch is another practice which is frowned upon. New construction runs year-round, so painters may switch the gutter and/or trim paint to oil-based paint because it skims over and won’t rain off nearly as easily as their preferred water-based counterparts. The problem is that oil-based paints do not hold up to the elements and will crack and peel off the gutters. We’ve cleaned up a lot of gutters because of this problem, and sheesh, what a mess! To be fair, when there’s a deadline to meet and the general contractor is on your back and the buyers need to get moved into their home, painters aren’t left with a whole lot of options. As they say, the show must go on. But, with repaints, there shouldn’t be such pressure, so there’s no reason to rush and deliver anything but a proper paint job.

How soon can it rain after a paint job?

This answer varies with humidity, dew point, temperature, wind, paint color and the product that is used. Under normal circumstance, most paints can withstand a shower or two after about 4 hours of drying time. The gutters are at the highest risk for issues because they are the most exposed. The water collects on the top rim of the gutter, runs down the front edge and then collects in big drips underneath on the bottom of the gutters. If the paint hasn’t had sufficient time to dry, this can turn into one ugly mess! If this happens, the best solution is to wait till weather clears then repaint.

High humidity, dark colorants, cool temperatures and reaching the dew point all slow up the drying time. Wind and warm temperatures speed up the drying time. Heat and air movement are critical for the paint to dry.

The dew point will affect the drying time the most. The temperature needs to be at least 5 degrees above the dew point in order for the paint to dry properly. The dew point is the point when moisture appears on surfaces. Unfortunately, if the paint gets wet from dew, it delays the drying process and can cause problems.

What’s the preferred air temperature for painting?

It’d sure be nice if it was sunny and 72 degrees with just a hint of a breeze every day, because then we wouldn’t have to worry about the weather. But, that’s unrealistic, so we’ve had to rely on the drying agents in paint to help us extend our season. Otherwise, there’d only be about three optimal days to paint in Oregon!

When it comes to painting, I am more concerned about the dew point than the temperature because most exterior paints are rated to 35 degrees. If the paint re-wets from the dew, it can ruin a perfectly good paint job.

If you must paint during the off season, a good rule of thumb to follow is to apply paint with an airless sprayer between the hours of 10 am to 2 pm. This way you are starting late enough for the air temperature to raise a bit and stopping to give the paint plenty of time to dry before nightfall.

If, while you are painting, the weather turns on you, take a deep breath, stay calm and think your options through. First, stop painting immediately. Second, check your work site to see if there is any wet paint that is in danger of raining off. If the paint has skimmed over, you may be okay. If you find areas that are washing off, try to find a way to protect those areas, such as draping plastic to provide a cover. If that’s not possible, you may have to let Mother Nature follow course and deal with a mess later. If paint starts raining off your house, try your best not to let it dry out once the rain subsides. If you get to the paint while it’s still wet, flushing the areas with plenty of water will dilute the wet paint and make for a much easier time of cleaning. This is where a pressure washer comes in handy, especially if the paint is dripping onto surrounding surfaces, such as concrete or the roof.

If the paint has cured to the point that it won’t wash off easily, you best run to the paint store for help. There are products, such as Krud Kutter that are made to remove dried latex paint. Just be sure to read and follow the instructions of the label.

And, most importantly, r-e-l-a-x. A paint disaster really is a miniscule problem in the grand scheme of things. As with most problems in life, there is a solution. A glass of wine won’t hurt either. If you’ve done your due diligence and hired a reputable painter, then trust your painter to take care of weather related issues. Weather is unpredictable, so there is no fool proof way to completely avoid Mother Nature’s wrath.

Bottom line – whether you hire a painting company to complete the job or you choose to do-it-yourself, I recommend waiting out inclement weather to help you achieve the spectacular results you hoping to achieve.

Wishing you a happy, sunny day!

Nancy

Front Door Color Options – Make a Great Impression

Front Door Color Options – Make a Great Impression

Exterior Painting Home Painting Paint color

Choosing the right color for your front door can seem intimidating at first, but will help create a great first impression of your home. Curb appeal is a hot topic in the real estate market and can improve the value of your home. What’s more inviting than a freshly painted and vibrant front door? I prefer selecting neutral tones for the exterior siding and trim in the Pacific Northwest because the neutral palette blends well with the landscape and ever changing cloudy skies. But who wants a boring house? I know I don’t, so I encourage my clients to use a color that pops on their front door.

Consider a vibrant orange, Kelly green, or even a warm, sunny yellow. This is the time to think of your favorite color and just go for it. Be daring and outrageous, really let your personality shine. Go for a color much deeper than you feel comfortable with or so bright that it scares you. This is one area where I’ve seen the risk of making a big, bold statement pay off.

Another consideration for your front door is to pick the right product and sheen. I love Rust-Oleum Sierra Beyond in a high gloss sheen. You can find this product at Powell Paint Centers.

Here are a few color choices to consider – all from the Benjamin Moore color line:

  1. Fresh Lime 2032-30: Choose this bold color to tie in with your green landscaping. This color replicates the green of spring.
  2. Patriot Blue 2064-20: If blue is your favorite color, there’s no better place to use it than your entrance.
  3. Sunflower 2019-30: Even the grumpiest neighbor can’t help smiling at this bright and sunny color.
  4. Vintage Wine 2116-20: A bold classic that will pop with the right amount of sheen.

The possibilities are endless, so have fun exploring the colorful side of you.

Until next time,

Nancy

Caulk failure? Your siding may be the problem

Caulk failure? Your siding may be the problem

Exterior Painting Home Contractors Uncategorized Women In Construction

 

Repainting your home is an investment. Under normal circumstances, if you hire professional painters who properly prepare and apply two coats of quality paint, and if you maintain your property between paint applications, you can expect your new paint job to last 10 to 15 years.

Unfortunately, sometimes other factors affect the longevity of a quality paint job. One of the most common, if unexpected, factors that can affect the appearance and longevity of paint is siding caulk failure.

Caulk is the waterproof filler and sealant used in building work and in repairs. It is often used by painters to fill cracks or repair holes in order to create a smooth and uniform surface on which paint can be applied. When caulk separates or fails to adhere to a surface it can result in unsightly cracks, breaks or openings into which moisture can seep and cause a secondary, and serious, problem.

This failure can happen for a variety of reasons. The most common cause is directly related to the substrate (siding material) to which the caulk (and paint) is applied. Due to exposure, weather and outdoor elements, siding wears over time. Some types tend to wear well while others tend to experience caulk failure at an alarming rate.

We have seen the majority of caulk failure occur with the most popular brand of siding used by today’s builders and remodelers: HardiePlank®.

HardiePlank® siding is very popular because it is an extremely durable alternative to vinyl or wood siding. When it’s new, it actually holds paint longer than any other siding and does not require back brushing or rolling, under normal circumstances, which makes it easy to work with.

The problem is mostly with HardiePlank® siding which was manufactured before 2008. This siding has had serious issues with cracking and breaking due to expansion and contraction of the product as temperatures vary.  The obvious fix for this problem was to caulk at the butt joints in order to close the gaps; however, the same expansion and contraction that caused the initial cracking causes the filler caulking to fail. As a result, the seal is broken, allowing water penetration to occur, even on a freshly painted house.

The manufacturer of HardiePlank® addressed this serious issue in 2008 by requiring builders to install flashing behind the butt joints and recommending that painters did not, from that point forward, caulk in the butt joints.  Thankfully, as a result of this change in policy, newer homes with this siding should not have a caulk failure problem. Unfortunately, because the “fix” for this problem is not widely known by all builders and painters, we still run across this type of caulk failure fairly frequently, even in homes built after 2008.

If you are a homeowner or manager for a property with HardiePlank® siding, it is important to understand that paint will not wear as well nor look as good when applied over siding that is failing due to cracking or breakage or caulk failure.  We cannot guarantee results when working with this type of siding, because the problem is with the product, not with the paint.

There are some things you can do to minimize the issue, however.  If your home was built before 2008 and you have HardiePlank® siding, you should regularly maintain it by:

  1. Replacing caulking as soon as you notice it failing.
  2. Touching up the paint after any caulking repairs – this will help maintain both the appearance and the seal.
  3. In extreme cases, siding replacement may be needed.

Home renovations are stressful even under the best of circumstances. Things like caulk failure can complicate your otherwise straightforward job; but, more knowledge about your property and your potential problems can help to assure a quality end product. If you have HardiePlank® siding, check it often for caulk failure and hire a well rated and well informed painter whenever you choose to re-paint.

Until next time,

Nancy

 

 

Brush, roll or spray; Which is the preferred method

Brush, roll or spray; Which is the preferred method

Exterior Painting Home Painting

 

Exterior paint can be applied using a variety of methods. The purpose of this post is to compare and contrast the most common methods and to explain how the processes we employ at Sisu Painting are guaranteed to get the best results.

Brushing and Rolling

Brushing and Rolling is a manual process that involves the application of two coats to meet manufacturer specifications.  While this type of process is both time and labor intensive, the painter is able to control the process and achieve an even coat and desired thickness.   This method provides excellent overall coverage, particularly important on “rough” siding surfaces such as cedar shakes or T-111.

If your siding is hardy plank construction that is smooth and non-porous, back brushing or rolling may not be necessary or even the best application, however; eaves, corner boards and trim almost always require two coats of paint with back-brushing or rolling for an even and attractive paint application.

Spraying

Airless sprayers are commonly used for exterior paint applications because the spraying method allows for a uniform paint application (in terms of thickness) as well as a relatively fast drying time. However, when working with rough siding such as cedar or T-111, the airless spraying method does not allow the paint to absorb into the siding and often results in an inconsistent coverage and eventual paint failure.

At Sisu we bring the best of both methods to your exterior paint job…

To achieve the quality results you’ve come to expect from Sisu, our painters apply the first coat of exterior paint using an airless sprayer followed immediately by back-brushing or back-rolling to assure that the paint is worked evening into the siding surface. They finish with a top coat. This method combines the best of both worlds to achieve the most attractive and longest lasting paint application possible.

Enjoy the sunshine,

Nancy

Choosing Paint Colors for Your Home

Choosing Paint Colors for Your Home

Exterior Painting Interior Painting Paint color

I am mad about color! I love how color looks and the way it affects my mood.  I love taking a space and transforming it with color or updating a house and watching people fall in love with their home again.  I am not an interior designer or professional decorator, but never-the-less, I offer a complimentary color consultation to each of my customers once they enter into a contract with us.  My eye for color and many years of experience are what I draw on to help choose the right color.

If you’ve ever stood in front of one of those displays in the paint store with the myriad of color swatches, pouring over magazines, checking out colors on line and fanning through the decks of color, you already know that choosing color can be hard!  How many colors should you choose?  Are accent walls all the craze they used to be? What color do you paint the ceiling?  Can I use more than one color on the trim?  Should I stay neutral and play it safe or should I go hog wild?

I will address each of these questions in this article and give you a few tips to help you achieve that beautiful palette you’ve been dreaming of.

How many colors? One of the first questions clients ask is how many colors for my walls.  Most of us have seen (or maybe even had ourselves) homes where each room is painted a different color.  This may have scared you enough that you are afraid to choose too many colors; and, rightly so!  More is not always better; in fact, more is just more.  I recommend sticking to three or four nice colors and that’s it!

Accent walls: I do not care for accent walls unless there is a specific reason for it, such as drawing attention to a fabulous piece of artwork or bringing focus to an architectural feature such as a fireplace.  I do not recommend using an accent color to add interest to your space.  If your space is that boring, focus on bringing in something of interest first, like an exceptional piece of furniture or artwork.  If you are struggling, this is where my interior designer friends excel.

Ceiling color: If you have vaulted ceilings, painting a color on the ceiling will bring it down and make your space cozy. If the ceilings are high enough, going darker on the ceiling than the wall can come off nicely.  I also like color added to tray ceilings, such are often found in dining rooms and master bedrooms.  Don’t be afraid to go dark or bold in these spaces; otherwise, I like white for ceilings.

Try to pick one white for all your ceilings.  This will help the flow of color from room to room and give your home a nice airy feel.  I prefer the whitest of whites for ceilings, such as Benjamin Moore’s Super White.  A warmer white that goes with just about any color is Sherwin William’s Dover White.  These are two whites that work well in almost any space with most colors.

Trim and wood work color:  White woodwork is gorgeous, but adding a bit of color to your woodwork can be just as beautiful!  The same whites that look good on the ceilings, look good on woodwork; but, white isn’t the only option!  Here’s one way to add a bit of color to your woodwork: Paint your kitchen island a dark color that compliments the rest of your woodwork, then carry that island color into another room, such as your study.  I also love painting the woodwork the same color as the walls, except with a different sheen.  If you decide to go this route, choose a flat for the walls and a satin for the trim.  This is great for both traditional and modern spaces.

Is a neutral palette the best choice?  A neutral palette is almost always reliable and beautiful.  Decorating rules tend to state that the walls should complement your furniture, not the other way around.   It’s the job of the wall color to make your belongings look better.  In fact, you’d be surprised how the correct color can make that shabby sofa look acceptable again. If you are picking colors for yourself, pull neutral colors out of your sofa, rug, artwork or other “inspiration” piece.  Pick colors that are related on the color wheel from room to room and don’t go crazy!  A few nice colors that feel related will go a long way in giving you the dream space you are looking for.

If you love bright, bold or unique colors that reflect your personality, don’t be afraid to use them.  Just use them sparingly.  A pop of color here or there, whether in a room or brought in with accent pieces is an excellent way to brighten up your house.  I love the extraordinary and unexpected – in limited amounts.

I’ve given you a lot of Sisu rules for choosing paint colors, but I have one caveat: “Decorating rules are made to be broken!”  Following all the rules would be rather boring, right?  But, unless you are experienced with decorating or have enlisted the help of a professional, it may have better results if you stick to the rules.

Happy decorating

Nancy

Color Wheel Basics – Choosing the Right Color Scheme

Color Wheel Basics – Choosing the Right Color Scheme

Exterior Painting Interior Painting Uncategorized

 

You’ve probably noticed that we focus on color a lot. Whether we’re talking about your interior or exterior paint color or choosing the perfect pops of color to complete your look, color is important to us! And why shouldn’t it be, it’s all around us. Talking about color can be difficult, however. We wanted to give you a leg up on the conversation and cover a few of the color “language” basics.

Primary colors

The primary colors are red, blue and yellow. All other colors are made by blending these three primary colors together.

color wheelColor Wheel

A color wheel is a circle with different colored sections that helps to show the relationship between colors. Color wheels can be simple, only showing the primary colors and their basic, blended counter parts (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple); or they can be complex, showing a large variety of hues and lightnesses.

warm colorsWarm Colors

These colors are the colors on the right half of our color wheel; specifically, the reds, yellows and oranges are all warm colors. When you think of warm colors, think about the amount of energy you want to give your space. They are “advancing” colors, meaning they appear closer, and will make a space feel cozier and slightly smaller.

cool colorsCool Colors

On the left half of our color wheel are the cool colors. These colors—blues, greens and purples—are receding. A cool color can be useful to calm down any space in your home, which is why they are commonly found indoors and in living spaces. They will make any area feel more open and tend to have a relaxing effect.

complimentary colorsComplimentary Colors

Color wheels can be awesome tools for easily choosing colors that match. Complimentary colors are one of these perks. Want to find colors that are very different but still look good together? Look across the color wheel for some complimentary color pairs like the one shown here. Opposites really do attract in this case!

monochromatic colorsMonochromatic Colors

Another color scheme that is relatively popular uses the variety of values (lighter or darker shades of the same color) to its advantage. We’ve seen monochromatic looks making a come back, specifically in terms of using different sheens to play colors up rather than changing the hue. A monochromatic look uses only one slice of the color wheel.

analogous colorsAnalogous Colors

If you’re not digging the contrast provided by complimentary colors, analogous colors may be more your speed. Look at a wider portion of the color wheel for your analogous options, including several different slices, and pick a pallet which appeals to you.

Do you have other color terms bogging you down? Let us know and we’ll do our best to help you out!

Until next time,

Nancy

Best Temperature to Paint a House

Best Temperature to Paint a House

Exterior Painting Home Painting

 

Weather can have both positive and negative effects on your paint job.  When it’s wet and soggy outside, the moisture in the air can slow down the drying process, even on the inside of your home.  If you hire a professional like Sisu Painting, Inc., you won’t need to concern yourself too much because; like all good painters, we are obsessed with the weather.

However, if you have decided to take on a painting project yourself or you feel uneasy about the painter’s you’ve hired, here are a few quick tips to guide you during the painting process.

  1. Read the paint can label and stay within the recommended guidelines for temperature. Not all paint products are created equal, so this is an important factor.
  2. Do not paint exteriors when it’s raining or there is impending rain.
  3. If the forecast is wrong and your paint gets rained on, do not panic.  Although it is not recommended to paint in the rain, most exterior paint products are waterborne, so a light sprinkle is unlikely to damage your paint job.  Almost all exterior paints have drying agents that quicken the drying process, usually skimming over within four hours.  A heavy rain may wash off fresh paint. In that case, you may being doing a bit of touch up painting.  The worst case scenario is that you will have a mess to clean up and need to repaint.
  4. Do not paint when it’s too hot.  If you are painting on a hot day, try painting the shadiest sides of the house to avoid the direct sun. Painting in direct sunlight on a very hot day will not produce the best results.  The paint might dry too fast, become gummy, possibly blister and if you are using an airless sprayer, can dry in the air as the paint is atomizing, before it hits the surface.  A good painter can tell when the paint is drying too quickly and will call it quits.
  5. Do not apply paint products or urethanes on interiors when it is extremely wet and cold.  You could experience bubbling or the product can sag.  This is because the paint or urethane is not drying fast enough.
  6. Avoid painting in the fog; and, a good rule of thumb to follow is to paint only when the air temperature is 5 degrees or more above the dew point.  Weather Underground is a good resource to find out what your current dew point and temperature is for your area.
  7. Heat plus air flow will help your paint dry.  If you are painting inside and having drying issues, turn up the heat and increase the airflow by opening windows or turning on a fan.
  8. Don’t watch your paint dry, I swear it slows down the process!

Now that you have somewhat of a handle on when to paint, don’t let anything stand in the way of your vision and that fabulous paint job!

Cheers!

Nancy Long