Will Paint Fix It? Sisu Tips on What to Expect

Will Paint Fix It? Sisu Tips on What to Expect

Home Painting Interior Painting

Painting always comes with a unique set of challenges for each client. Things that weren’t apparent before painting become visible once we’ve started and customer expectations can be unrealistic. I get it. You’ve paid god knows how much for this interior paint job and darn well expect it to look exactly like you’ve dreamed it would. We want the same thing! Not only are you our customer, you are our lifeline–the people who keep us afloat in this crazy world. We love you and want the best for you! Unfortunately, there are some things that a good paint job just won’t fix.

Got cracks, holes, or texture that looks like the rough side of a bad day?

As much as paint can transform a space in an amazing way, it will not fix all your wall issues. If there’s a visible structural defect before you paint, chances are good it will still be noticeable after you paint. Structural defects can be sneaky, only showing their ugly faces once the wallpaper is off or the furniture is out of the room. Sometimes they’re obvious from the get-go. If your painter claims he can fix the waves, cracks or holes in your walls using paint, he’s probably lying to you. If you’re working with us, we’ll let you know as soon as we find any issues.

 Woeful Woodwork

Trim, baseboards and door casings all tend to suffer from woodwork neglect. Years of wear and tear can leave them looking rough and dinged up. Moisture damage on exposed wood can cause raised grain. As a professional painting company, we know a couple of tricks of the trade that can give you beautiful results. We’ll sand, fill with Bondo or wood filler, use PeelBond or TrimMagic, prime and do anything else we can think of to improve the finish of your wood. Paint will protect and clean up your woodwork. It won’t fix any flaws inherent in the substrate. Additionally, if you find dry rot anywhere, don’t paint over it! Dry rot needs to be removed and the wood replaced by a professional. Hiding the problem won’t help in the long run.

Terrible Texture

Once we landed a job repainting ceilings. It would have been straight forward enough, except for the fact that the homeowner’s main motivating factor for painting was more complicated than a tired color. The texture was peeling off! We looked closer at the damaged area and were amazed that the texture and drywall were not primed. That may not mean anything to you, but to us it was apparent that this was going to be a huge issue. Due to the lack of primer, any paint or texture we applied would just fall off again. We explained to the homeowners that this was a pre-existing condition (something we hadn’t accounted for in the scope of work and couldn’t guarantee in the long run).

As with all of our clients, we did everything in our power to resolve the issue. We called in a drywaller to repair the places where the texture had failed. When they were done, we sprayed the ceilings with an oil-based Z-Prime coat which we let dry overnight. The primer sealed the texture so that we could paint without re-damaging it. When we painted, we used two coats of paint applied with an airless sprayer, making sure not to back roll so the texture wouldn’t be damaged. The results were miraculous (if I do say so myself) and our efforts probably saved the customer thousands of dollars! The moral of the story? Just because paint can’t fix your texture doesn’t mean that it can’t be fixed by a painting pro and a fantastic drywaller.

 Revolting Repairs

We’ve been called in to right the wrongs of other contractors. Shoddy wall repairs can ruin the feel of your whole space and leave you feeling jaded towards contractors generally. First, we’d like to apologize to anyone who’s ever been of a victim of this type of disservice! How terrible, to put your home and your money on the line and have results which are less than pleasing! You have all of our sympathy. Secondly, there is a glimmer of hope. Although sometimes these repairs can be too time consuming to fix (a nice way of saying too expensive) and outside of the services we offer, painting can still perk up your space.

For everything else there’s spackle and caulk. Minor holes and slight cracks can be filled in using one of these two products, but they aren’t guaranteed to succeed. Proper prep work should include fixing what can be fixed and letting you, the customer, know about everything else. Sometimes, there’s nothing to do but call a drywaller. If you have any doubts about your space and its inherent flaws call us, email us, or tweet us! We are happy to help.

 

Ceilings – Sisu’s Six Essential Painting Tips

Ceilings – Sisu’s Six Essential Painting Tips

Home Painting Interior Painting

De-stress the idea

Make sure that the ceiling needs to be painted in the first place.

Are you painting your walls?

If so, I definitely recommend painting your ceiling. Think of your ceiling as another wall in the room. Would you skip painting any other walls? Of course not. And, once you get that fresh coat of paint on your walls, I guarantee you will not want to revisit the project by attempting to paint the ceilings later on down the road. Taping off walls and protecting them from splatter is a chore in and of itself.

Should you skip painting it?

The only time I recommend skipping the ceilings is if they have been recently painted AND the wall color will flow with the existing ceiling color. If the ceiling color does not match the new wall colors, I recommend painting the ceiling.

If you have a water leak or other damage you need to paint over, you may not need to paint the walls. In this case, you will have to cover all your walls with plastic to protect from splatter.

Get awesome results

Use the right equipment:

I can’t stress this enough. You need the correct size extension pole to attach to your roller handle. This will make life so much easier. This will also keep you off the ladder because you can paint the ceiling from the floor (unless you have really tall ceilings). You also need the proper ladder.Choose the right ladder with help from Sherwin WilliamsMake sure it’s the correct height for the job and that it’s sturdy and set up properly. I recommend a good quality brush and rollers as well.

 

 

Completely cover the floor (and all belongings) with drop cloths, paper or plastic:

Save yourself the hassle from having to move around drop cloths by covering the entire floor and furniture before you open the can of paint. The centrifugal force of the roller will throw tiny droplets of paint that will splatter everywhere. Think ahead and cover all exposed surfaces. 

Use a high-quality ceiling paint:

You don’t need the most expensive paint, but if you go too cheap, you might not get the coverage you need. I recommend Benjamin Moore’s Ceiling Paint.

Cut in first:

Sisu painter cutting inUse a brush to cut in the edges, the corners and around light fixtures or other hardware. Choose a container that will fit comfortably in your hand. Pour paint off from your gallon into your container but only fill about 1/3 full. Dip your brush into the container, covering just the ends of the brush – only dip in about ½ inch or so. Don’t overload your brush. Apply the paint around the perimeter of the room with your brush and around any fixtures.

Roll out an even coat:

The best way to get an even coat is to evenly coat your roller when you are loading it up. Applying loaded-up roller in a W pattern on ceilingApply the loaded-up roller in an N or W pattern, then go back and roll over it to spread it out. Work your way from one side of the room to the other until your entire ceiling is covered. Do not worry if it looks uneven while it’s drying.  Once it’s dry, it’ll look much better.

 

Paint two coats:

After you’ve done all the work to get the first coat on, it might be tempting to say “done is better than perfect” but in this case, let’s just do it right. The second coat is half the work of the first coat and it’s the step that’s going to take your hard work to next level. I almost always recommend two coats. If you want a professional looking job, paint the second coat.

I hope these tips help you achieve the results you are looking for. And remember, we are always more than happy to bid the job for you!

Until next time,

Nancy