How Much Does It Cost to Paint a House?

How Much Does It Cost to Paint a House?

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The cost of painting a house can average between $5,685 to $6,749. Customers often ask for a square footage cost based on the size of their home; when in reality, it’s the square footage of the wall surface that we base our calculations on. This is why we measure when we provide a quote. Other factors can also influence the cost to paint a house.

Exterior vs Interior

In addition, the cost to paint exterior of house is calculated differently than the cost to paint interior of house. So, how can you budget for your home maintenance or remodel? My formulas for the cost to paint a house are proprietary and I really don’t want to give my hard-earned calculations to my competitors, so I’ve done the next best thing. I searched my records for the costs of the past 20 interior and 20 exterior paint jobs. These amounts encompass a variety of jobs and are a base for knowing the average cost, big or small:

 

AVERAGE PRICE EXTERIOR OF HOUSE:      $6,749

Exterior of house painted by Sisu

AVERAGE PRICE INTERIOR OF HOUSE:       $4,620

Portion of interior painted by Sisu

Contributing Factors

Many factors contribute to the cost of painting a house: the size of the project, the detail involved, the number of colors, the age of the home, the amount of prep work, and so on. Recently, we painted a stairwell for $350 and the owner supplied the paint. We also got paid over $18,000 for painting the interior and exterior of a new build pool house. All in all, the best way to get the cost of your painting project is to schedule a bid.

If you’re just looking to have a room painted, the average price to the paint walls of a 12’ x 12’ bedroom with 8-foot ceilings is about $556 for a two-coat color change. If you paint more rooms, the price can come down, so there’s always that to consider. The time of year can affect pricing. Currently, we are running a 25% off special because our exterior season is over and we naturally slowdown in the winter. This discount brings the cost of interior house painting way down. We hope this information helps you to budget your painting project.

Waterborne vs Oil-Based Paint That is the Question

Waterborne vs Oil-Based Paint That is the Question

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Water-based paints have come a long way since they were first introduced in the 1940s and 50s. Today we use water-based paints on exteriors because oil-based paints tend to get brittle and will crack and peel. Interior wall and ceiling paints are almost exclusively waterborne paint with few exceptions. But, when it comes to trim paint, the options become a little broader and occasionally oil-based paint is appropriate.

As waterborne products become more advanced, the oil-based options seem to dwindle.

Here’s what we love about oil-based paints

Example of oil-based eggshell sheen

  1. Best sheen – nothing compares to the sheen of oil-based paints. It is sophisticated and subtle and has an appearance you cannot attain with water-based products
  2. Best leveling properties. The paint takes longer to dry so it levels out better, especially when brushed. This makes for a beautiful finish that’s hard to achieve with the water-based product

What we don’t love about oil-based paint

  1. It’s bad for the environment – oil-based paints have VOC’s (volatile organic compounds) that gas off and pollute the environment
  2. The finish yellows over time. Recent regulations lowering the VOC content allowed in paint has increased the amount of yellowing that we encounter
  3. The finish gets brittle and will chip and chip and crack over time. This problem has also increased with the recent regulations
  4. The finish does not clean well. The paint will pick up grime and oil that is impossible to keep clean. This problem is especially bad on cabinetry, which tends to be a high traffic area
  5. The finish does not touch up well

What we love about waterborne paints

  1. Waterborne paints are more durable than oil-based products
  2. The product dries quickly
  3. The finish does not yellow over time
  4. The product touches up easily
  5. The paint cleans up with water
  6. The finish is easy to maintain
  7. The product sprays out beautifully

What we don’t love about waterborne paints

  1. Waterborne paints don’t level as well as oil-based paints, so they show more brush strokes and stipple if painted by hand
  2. The sheen is not as nice as oil-based paints

The hybrid water-based enamels on the market, called modified alkyds are performing quite well. The drying time is a bit slower, so they level better. We love these products for their durability, ease of application and beauty.

Benjamin Moore Advance Satin Water-Base Acrylic-Alkyd PaintSherwin Willaims ProClassic Water-Based Acrylic-Alkyd Paint

I prefer to use oil-based over waterborne paint on trim, if the house has historical significance and the paint will be applied with a brush. Brushed oil-based paint is lovely and gives the look that older homes seem to call for, especially if you are not painting the entire house. It’s always best to keep the finishes as uniform as possible. If you have previously hand painted oil-based paints that you are matching up to, then I recommend sticking with the oil-based products.

If you need help deciding which paint will be appropriate for you next painting project, we are just a phone call away and we are always happy to help where we can.

Until next time,

Nancy

Painter’s Tape – Choose the Right One

Painter’s Tape – Choose the Right One

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Wandering through the aisles of a paint store trying to pull everything together for your DIY painting project can feel overwhelming. From painter’s tape to drop cloths and paintbrushes to sponges, the options are practically endless. Some of these things won’t make a difference in your end product—the plastic you put on the floor probably won’t mess up your walls—but things like brushes and tape can make a huge impact on your lines and finish.

Let’s focus on the tape

Painting without tape is like trying to color in the lines on a tiny picture with a giant marker. It’s going to end in tears. Painting with the wrong tape can be just as bad. If it’s not sticky enough, you will end up with squiggly lines instead of straight ones. If it’s too sticky, you can end up with glue residue on the walls and other adhesion issues.

Recommended types of tape

Most of the tapes that we recommend are 3M™ products, the makers of Scotch® brand tape. These types may be more expensive than other options; but you really will get what you pay for. Cheaper means less quality when it comes to tape.

Scotch Masking Tape for production painting Scotch® Masking Tape for Production Painting 2020 is a high adhesion tape with a 3-day safe release.

Where: Use this tape in places that require high adhesion, mostly exteriors or hard to tape places inside.

Why: With 2020, you won’t have to worry about the wind blowing down your paper or plastic once you’ve stuck it to your trim and windows. You’ll have three days to use and remove this tape without risking sticky, messy residue on your surfaces. This is the shortest release period and the stickiest tape we’ll recommend, so be careful where you choose to use it. Make sure to take it off promptly.

Scotchblue Painter's Tape for multi surfaces

ScotchBlue™ Painters Tape for Multi-Surfaces 2090 is a medium adhesion tape with a 14-day safe release.

Where: Use this tape for most of your painting projects, especially if they’ll take more than a few days, both interior and exterior.

Why: With 2090 you’ll have good adhesion without worrying about removing it in the three-day time window that 2020 provides. While you’ll have two weeks to finish your project before being concerned with adhesion issues, you also won’t have to worry about the tape coming off before you’re done.

Scotchblue Painter's Tape low-medium adhesionScotchBlue™ Painters Tape 2080 is a low-medium adhesion tape with a 60-day safe release.

Where: Use this tape for interiors, especially on delicate surfaces or on projects that may take a few weekends.

Why: With 2080 you’ll have an easy to work with tape that produces awesome straight lines. This tape is our favorite for interiors both because of the two-month safe release and because you don’t have to worry about paint seeping (bleeding) under the tape as much as you would with 2020 or 2090. We’ll warn you that this product is a lot more expensive than either 2020 or 2090, however. Like we said before, you get what you pay for!

Frogtape comes in a variety of adhesion levelsFrogtape® is not a 3M product and can be purchased in a variety of adhesion levels (multi-surface or delicate surface).

Where: Use this tape for interiors and special projects, like painting patterns/geometric murals. There is also a variety specifically for heavily textured surfaces.

Why: With Frogtape® you’ll get the added bonus of PaintBlock® Technology, which is a special film on the tape that reacts with wet paint to form a seal. The idea is that this will mean no bleeding, or minimal bleeding, and straighter lines. Our painters have mixed feelings about Frogtape®; but, if your lines are the most important part of your project, it may be a good choice for you. They also offer Shape Tape ™ which lets you create custom designs with much less work than standard tape as it’s already patterned in a couple of different shapes.

 Tape Width

Once you’ve picked the tape that’s right for you, all that’s left is to decide what width you’ll need. As professionals, we use one or one-and-a-half-inch tape. As a homeowner, using tape as wide as two inches gives you a bit of wiggle room—not that we’d ever accuse anyone of being sloppy!

It’s pretty much downhill from here as far as the tough choices go. Our painter’s tip to you: make sure to take the time to tape off properly and run your finger along the edge of the tape once you’ve applied it. The friction from your finger against the tape will create heat to activate the glue. This helps to achieve the straight lines you’re looking for.

Good luck!

Nancy

Old Paint – Don’t Let it Take Over Your Garage

Old Paint – Don’t Let it Take Over Your Garage

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A lot of our blogs focus on the “befores” of painting – how to pick colors, how to prep and common problems – but we haven’t talked a lot about what to do after, when your garage is packed three layers deep with hundreds of old paint cans. Well, hopefully not literally hundreds…

Like most people, you probably don’t have any idea what to do with all those old gallons and quarts. Can you throw it away? Should you recycle them? What colors do you need to keep? What does it all mean? Rather than pushing you into an existential crisis, let us help you out when it comes to your stock pile of interior and exterior paint.

First, figure out which paint cans you can ditch

Our advice is this: if it’s up on your walls hold onto it. Your existing project might require touch ups and you’ll want to have the leftover paint on hand to make those go smoothly. If you don’t have a ton left, transfer it into a quart can (which are available at your local paint store) for easy storage. Eliminate the guess work and endless can opening by clearly labeling each of your colors using the product/color name, sheen and color code—especially if you transfer cans.

Once you’ve figured out what to keep, make sure that the cans are properly sealed. Knock the lid down tight so that your paint won’t dry out before you get a chance to use it.

For the rest of your half empty, old, dried out (or drying out) paint we’ve got a few suggestions.

Are your gallons still pretty full?

If so, we suggest recycling. Oregon, California and Connecticut all have built in paint fees (like an alcohol or cigarette tax) which were included when you purchased your gallon/quart. The fees go towards the PaintCare program which provides drop off sites for recycling old paint. Looking for a location near you? PaintCare Oregon has at least 101 drop sites for paint recycling, click here to find the most convenient one.

Are your cans empty?

If they are just dump them in the trash. There’s nothing wrong with putting them in your regular garbage and the recycling centers will not take empty cans.

Do your cans still have wet paint in them, but not enough to recycle?

If you’re left with just a little bit in the can, remove the lid and let it dry out. Once it’s dry, feel free to throw it away just like you would with an entirely empty can.

If you have paints or solvents that PaintCare will not take care of, you can check with Earth 911 to find current drop off sites for all your recycling needs. Hopefully we’ve answered all your questions; but, if not the office staff here at Sisu Painting, Inc. would be happy to assist in any way possible at (503) 646-1211.

Happy painting!

Nancy

Essential Maintenance Projects You Should Do Now!

Essential Maintenance Projects You Should Do Now!

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Spring is here. And you know what that means! Here are 7 of the most essential maintenance projects to get started on. Oh, and a special offer from one of our cleaning professional partners!
Don’t wait until the next paint job to wash your house. Washing your house will make your paint job last longer, your house look better, and it’s a great way to inspect your exterior from top to bottom to see if there are any hidden issues. We recommend washing your house every one or two years. Sisu Painting pressure washes year-round, so we are here if you need us.
Cut back your landscaping at least one foot away from your house. Did you know that plants have airborne mold that will attach to your house and ruin your paint job? And, let’s not talk about how unsightly it looks. We’re all about being green here in Oregon, but green mold on your house spells nothing but trouble. Stay ahead of the problem by cutting back your bushes. A little household bleach and water can arrest mold growth.
Check your air conditioner. Hot weather will be upon us before you know it! Perform essential maintenance: remove the cover, change the filter, check the hoses, add Freon, have an inspection or whatever it is that your air conditioner needs to keep you calm and cool this summer.
This is on everyone’s home maintenance list, but nothing is more embarrassing than having your smoke alarm go off at midnight, calling 911 and waking up the whole neighborhood with ambulances and fire trucks only to find out the alarm is outdated and that it was only an internal warning alarm to let you know. This seriously happened to someone here at Sisu Painting this month. Spoiler alert: it was the owners.
No seriously, purge it! You have summer projects coming up, you need the room and you don’t need all that junk. Someone out there does, so clear your space and your mind and donate those wares to your favorite neighborhood charity.
Not too many people are willing to dig out the 30-foot ladder and clean their roof and gutters and luckily you don’t have to. We recommend All-Clean Soft Wash for this service and they are kindly running a special for our customers. Click on the coupon below!
This is starting to sound more like a spring-cleaning guide than a maintenance list, but ‘tis the season! Contact All-Clean Soft Wash and don’t forget your coupon for half off dryer vent cleaning with a window service or any one of their other services! Not only will you get a better view of all the spring flowers, keeping things clean is the best way to spot problems and address them before they turn into remodel projects.
We hope these tips help you achieve the results you are looking for. And remember, we are always more than happy to bid a job for you! CLICK HERE to get your FREE QUOTE for your next painting project.
Fresh Paint – Keep it Looking New

Fresh Paint – Keep it Looking New

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There’s nothing like a fresh coat of paint to brighten your space and lighten your spirits. But once tarps come down and the painters are gone, what do you do to keep your new paint job looking bright and “like new?”

Handle with care

Fresh paint will feel dry to the touch, but it actually takes several weeks for the paint to fully cure. Latex or waterborne paint cures in approximately 30 days; whereas, oil based paints can take around 60 days.

Protect your investment interiors

Curing

During the time when interior paint is curing, it is important not to clean or otherwise disturb the surface. Allowing the paint time to cure will significantly increase the longevity of your new paint job.

New paint – proper care and cleaning

  • Flat paint, which is the sheen I almost always recommend for walls, requires special care. Use a damp cloth to wipe away any smudges or dirt. Avoid rewetting the surface if at all possible. In cases of difficult marks or stains, it may be best to touch up the area with the original paint.
  • Trim work is generally painted with sheen, usually satin or semi-gloss, which is easier to clean. Trim paint can rewet with excessive scrubbing, however, and you should never use an acidic cleaner on any paint surface as it can actually strip the paint away. A simple solution of Dawn dish soap and water is recommended for cleaning trim work. This also works great for stubborn stains on walls.

Touch up instead

Sometimes, a painted surface cannot be cleaned without damaging the paint. In this case, I recommend touching up the paint with the original paint (leftover from the paint job). After a certain period of time, which varies depending on environment and lifestyle, regular wear and tear from daily living will necessitate a fresh paint job rather than a touch up.

Protect your investment exteriors

Freshly painted house exterior

Exterior paint surfaces require extra care due to environmental exposure of weather and outdoor elements. If exteriors are not maintained, mold and mildew can develop – a condition which will eventually ruin the paint job. To avoid this, take the following precautions:

Inspect

A visual inspection of the house will reveal signs of mold/mildew or excess dirt from rain or weather conditions.

Clean

I recommend pressure washing the exterior surfaces as needed. Treat any mold or mildew buildup with a dilute household  bleach solution or a mildewcide.

  • Loose paint may come off during the washing. If this occurs, it is an indication of a paint failure situation that must be dealt with. It is recommended that you use a professional painting company for any paint failure issue.
  • Avoid the use of TSP (tri-sodium phosphate) for maintenance cleaning. This chemical can de-gloss the paint.

 

Until next time – keep smiling!

~Nancy

Kitchen Cabinets – Replacement versus Painting

Kitchen Cabinets – Replacement versus Painting

Home Painting Interior Painting Paint color Uncategorized

Don’t let age get you downDated Kitchen Cabinets

Kitchen cabinets age no matter what. What was in vogue yesterday is out of style today. That’s pretty much a fact for any interior design element, but once your cabinets start to look dated, it makes the entire space seem like a bad scene out of the past.

Replacement

If you are considering an update to your kitchen (or bathroom) by replacing your cabinets, you may experience a bit of sticker shock once you begin to add up the expenses. At first glance, tackling this project looks pretty doable. You stop by the big box store, price out a few cabinets and you think, “I got this”. But, after the measuring is all said and done and you decide you prefer an upgrade to real wood and you add in the costs of the hardware and installation plus factor in the down time for your kitchen, it all starts to get a little daunting. This, you realize, is not the simple update you were expecting. All of a sudden, this seemingly inexpensive project easily tops 10k, more often exceeding 15k or even 20k.  If you happen to have a large kitchen, the price just goes up from there.

If you are financially suited to take on the costs of new kitchen cabinets and you find a style that you are crazy about, then by all means, I recommend it.

Painting

However, if you want to keep within a certain budget or you simply prefer to preserve environmental resources, you may wish to consider painting your kitchen cabinets.

Wood cabinets are the best substrate for painting (verses MDF, laminates or melamine) and we can achieve impressive and durable results with our process. We offer options to paint or glaze, depending on your preference, with the costs ending up substantially less than replacement. You can also paint or glaze in just about any color, so your options are endless.

If you choose to paint, we will generally de-gloss, prime, prep and apply two coats of paint with an airless sprayer. The costs of painting are roughly 1/4 to 1/3 the cost of replacement. Glazing is a high-end finish and requires painting as described above, hand applied glaze and top coating with polyurethane. This finish is spectacular. I prefer my glazed oak cabinets over any new product on the market and the cost is roughly 1/3 to 1/2 of replacement – potentially saving you thousands of dollars! The clear coating over the top of the paint and glaze gives you an extremely durable end product as well.

I recommend that you hire only the most reputable companies to paint or glaze your cabinets. Cabinet painting requires special skills and products, and this is one project you will want to leave for the professionals.

Things to think about before painting starts

While painting your kitchen cabinets will update your home and improve your property value, it is also a detailed undertaking and can be disruptive. Here some ways to prepare for this type of painting project.

Kitchen cabinets

Be prepared to lose access to your kitchen for a few days. Please empty the drawers and remove just enough belongings from the boxes to allow enough wiggle room to tape off for painting. It’s a good idea to have your wine, coffee, and other small appliances that you’ll need moved to another space, so you’ll have access to these items for the duration of the project.Painting the boxes is our priority to get you back into your kitchen as soon as possible.

Oven use

Do not use your oven during the painting. This is dangerous and could cause a fire. Please make other arrangements for meal preparation.

Dust

We will make a tent to protect your house from excessive dust. However, the tent is not airtight, so please expect a little extra dusting after the project is completed. One of the reasons people hire us is because we are meticulous, but cabinets require a ton of sanding. There’s no efficient way to contain the dust 100 percent.

Door painting

The system that we use to paint the doors requires us to drill holes in either the top or bottom of the door. We use these holes to install hooks, so we can hang the doors to paint all six sides at once. The holes will be filled and will not be visible once the doors are re-hung.

After-care

The cabinets will feel dry to the touch within hours; however, it can take a month or longer before they fully cure. No need to worry! Just take a little extra care and avoid chemicals when wiping up spills.

New hardware

If you are planning on installing new hinges or drilling new holes for handles, we recommended that they be fitted BEFORE painting. We can do the installation and charge time and material.

Most importantly, relax and enjoy the process!

Nancy

How Repainting Your Home Can Help You Sell It Quickly

How Repainting Your Home Can Help You Sell It Quickly

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As you lived life in your home—bought new furniture, decorated for holidays, tried not to step on toys underfoot—your paint may have receded into the background. But as you prepare to sell your house, remember that paint will be something prospective buyers notice. People buy from their sense of emotional connection to a house, and that connection comes through the eyes. Paint is a major source of visual appeal: It can welcome, dazzle, and delight, or it can make a house look neglected and ugly.

 

Paint can even increase your home’s value. A Consumer Reports survey shows that fresh paint in key indoor places can up value 1-3%, and that a newly painted exterior can increase value 2-5%. Fresh neutral shades add to a home’s look of well-being and cleanliness, and they are the right backdrop for effective home staging. Plus, it can be harder to sell a home whose walls boast a full palette of colors or unusual colors, like that purple bedroom the kids loved so dearly.

 

Savvy sellers will research the best time to sell a house, and this time will vary due to location, climate, business shifts, etc. But the national trend data show that the autumn months ahead are a good time to close on a home sale. Although homes usually sell quickest in June and July, the fall months do see homes sell after spending fewer than average days on the market. And fall closings often come with the highest sale prices.

 

Depending on your area and its seasons, selling a house in the fall may mean paint becomes even more important. As brilliant leaves fade and colorful gardens shrivel to brown stalks, a beautiful paint job will take center stage, becoming more noticeable and providing most of the home’s vital first impression.

 

It’s important to hire a licensed painter with stellar recommendations. The best source to find house painters is your real estate agent, who is sure to know a trusted professional you can rely on. If you’re not currently working with a realtor, ask friends and neighbors for referrals, check the neighborhood for good painters at work, or check online. Sites such as Houzz, Angie’s List, NextDoor, and others can match you with the right person or team for the job. Look for plentiful and mostly positive reviews, and note those painters whose clients have taken the time to tell a flattering story or post an “After” photo.

 

The painters you choose should gladly give you an estimate, a contract with costs, time frame, materials listed, and a guarantee of their work. Whether they help you outside, inside, or both, repainting can take you a long way towards a quicker home sale.

 

 

Winter Paint Colors – Fresh Inspiration

Winter Paint Colors – Fresh Inspiration

Home Painting Interior Painting Paint color Uncategorized

Winter in Oregon is a pretty monochromatic affair; but, this year, when the temperatures dropped down below freezing, ice frosted the ground and snow flurries fell gently from the sky, we couldn’t help but be enchanted by the colors of winter. The cold, cold winter days bring to mind images of evergreens cloaked in snow, of holly berries and of shimmery blue icicles.

We love these chilly, winter colors and want to inspire you

Bring the best of winter into your home using color.

Wintery Whites
alabaster, winter, wintery white

Alabaster 7008

It would be silly to think of winter without thinking of snow, ice, and the color white. Although picking the right shade can be tricky, the perfect white can leave your spaces feeling crisp and clean. Most commonly, white is used on ceilings and trim. You can also use it on your walls for a modern look. Though most people think of white walls as boring, they can be useful in helping your unique furniture and artwork to stand out. Some of the whites we love are Sherwin William’s Dover White 638 or Alabaster 7008 and Benjamin Moore’s Super White (stock) or Cloud White OC-130.

 

Blustery Blues
palladian blue, blue, winter, wintery blue

Palladian Blue HC-144

This chilly, winter color has seen a comeback in recent years. While it experienced a decrease in popularity (perhaps clients were haunted by memories of their baby blue childhood bedrooms) for a while, blue has always been my favorite color and will feel fresh and relaxing, even in your most stressful spaces. Don’t be daunted by the variety of blues available, choose a softer blue for a wintery feel—we recommend Benjamin Moore’s Palladian Blue HC-144. Looking for something a little brighter? Avalon Teal CSP-645 from Benjamin Moore will be the crowning jewel in your winter color pallet.

 

Roaring Reds
pomegranate, winter color, winter red

Pomegranate AF-295

Snuggling up next to a warm fire is one of those winter time activities that we just can’t get enough of! Whether or not you have a fireplace in your home. adding some of the passion that red has to your space can make it feel a little less dismal this winter, and a lot cozier. Bring the heat to your walls using a deep red like Benjamin Moore’s Pomegranate AF-295 or its fiery counterpart, Chili Pepper 2004-20. Both colors are sure to warm up even the coldest of winter nights.

 

 

Gorgeous Greens
cascade green, winter green, cool green

Cascade Green 0066

Especially here in Oregon, where green could be the state color, winter is the season for greens! You can find it in holly leaves, in wreathes, in evergreens and, of course, in the Christmas tree. Green is earthy and calming and picking the best green for you could be the easiest paint choice you’ll ever make. Almost all greens can be used with great versatility in every room of your house. We’ve narrowed it down to just a couple of greens that will compliment your wintery décor. Feeling frosty? Check out Sherwin William’s Cascade Green 0066—this green pairs well with gray and is more of a neutral green. Our other, darker choice is Sherwin William’s Basil 6194.

 

Great Grays
light winter gray, cool gray, french gray

Light French Gray 0055

If green isn’t Oregon’s state color, gray might be. For us, one gray day after another might make you feel a little stir crazy by February; but, gray doesn’t always have to bring you down! Gray can lend sophistication and grace to your space, and gray is always in style. For us, Benjamin Moore’s Tranquility AF-490 is a great, wintery version of this color. Another option would be Sherwin William’s Light French Gray 0055. Both of these colors are great for the winter and all year round!

 

What colors inspire you? If you want one of these colors in your homes or are having trouble picking a color, let us know. After all paint is what we do!

Wishing you a great start to your year,

Nancy

How To: Wall Repairs for Holes Smaller Than A Fist

How To: Wall Repairs for Holes Smaller Than A Fist

Home Painting Interior Painting Uncategorized

Drywall is not the strongest substrate in the planet.  In fact, without much effort or completely by accident, it’s easy to put an unsightly hole in a wall.  Drywall damage often happens during picture-hanging, due to an accidental drop of a heavy object, or the occasional hole-punching teen tantrum.  Believe me; I’ve seen it all…

The good news is, small drywall holes are quite easy to repair!  Just follow these simple instructions:

Repairing nail or screw holes – flush fill the hole:

Simply dab a little lightweight spackle on your index fingers to fill the hole, wiping any excess away with your finger or a light cloth.  No need for putty knives and sanding.  Keep it simple and it’ll blend quite well with your orange peel texture.  If the edges of the holes have flared out from the fastener that you removed, you may want to knock down these edges with your putty knife before you fill.  Smooth walls can be a little more finicky, so you may need to sand it smooth after proper drying time.  With small holes like this, less is better.  We see a lot mistakes when homeowners overdo the putty, which usually creates more work later.

For larger holes that require patching – gather these commonly available items:

  1. Putty knife – size depends on the size of the hole you are repairing
  2. Yellow fiberglass drywall mesh tape – self adhesive
  3. Drywall mud – 20 minute mud will work just fine
  4. Utility blade (snap knife works great)
  5. Sponge
  6. Rattle can texture for textured walls – I recommend Homax Oil Based Wall Texture for Orange Peel; they also have one for knock down, but most walls have an orange peel texture.
  7. Primer – water based wall primer will be sufficient
  8. Touch up paint
  9. Paint brush/roller and frame

Here are the steps for repairing the hole:

  1. Trim back the drywall paper about a quarter to half inch around the perimeter of the hole.  The drywall paper will peel off the drywall after you score it, exposing the bare drywall.
  2. Apply strips of dry wall mesh over the hole to cover the hole; overlapping the strips of mesh and attaching it to the exposed drywall, then trim the excess off with your blade so that the edges of the yellow tape do not overlap onto the textured parts of the wall.  This gives you a base to apply the drywall  mud so you don’t need to patch in with a piece of drywall
  3. Apply the drywall mud over the top of the yellow tape with your putty knife, gradually building it up to create a smooth surface; “feather it out” over the edges onto the textured wall to create uniform converage
  4. Allow the drywall mud to firm up, but not completely set (about 10-15 minutes)
  5. Take a wet sponge and start working the drywall mud in a circular motion, keeping the sponge wet at all times to smooth out the drywall patch.  Be patient and work slowly.  It will create lather as you gradually smooth out the patch
  6. Once the patch is smooth and flush, clean out your sponge and wipe the patch clean
  7. Allow the patch to finish drying
  8. Apply a coat of primer with a brush or roller and allow to dry
  9. Warm your rattle can texture under water to build pressure and shake the can for a full two minutes – DO NOT SKIMP ON THIS STEP
  10. Practice spraying on a piece of cardboard or paper.  When you are spraying, spray in a continuous, circular motion
  11. Adjust the nozzle till the spray pattern matches the wall
  12. Spray the texture as you practiced.  Do not over apply the texture.  This only takes a few seconds.  It’s better to spray too little than too much, because you can always add more13.Allow to dry 5 or so minutes, then apply the final coat of primer
  13. After the primer is dry, apply the touch up paint

If you follow these steps, you can repair a hole in the wall in just a couple of hours.  If you have trouble with the wet sanding step, you can allow the patch to completely dry and use drywall screens to sand it down. This creates dust, so we prefer to wet sand.

I hope these directions will help you achieve great results!  Let us know how your project turns out.

Best regards,

Nancy