Brush, roll or spray; Which is the preferred method

Brush, roll or spray; Which is the preferred method

Exterior Painting Home Painting

 

Exterior paint can be applied using a variety of methods. The purpose of this post is to compare and contrast the most common methods and to explain how the processes we employ at Sisu Painting are guaranteed to get the best results.

Brushing and Rolling

Brushing and Rolling is a manual process that involves the application of two coats to meet manufacturer specifications.  While this type of process is both time and labor intensive, the painter is able to control the process and achieve an even coat and desired thickness.   This method provides excellent overall coverage, particularly important on “rough” siding surfaces such as cedar shakes or T-111.

If your siding is hardy plank construction that is smooth and non-porous, back brushing or rolling may not be necessary or even the best application, however; eaves, corner boards and trim almost always require two coats of paint with back-brushing or rolling for an even and attractive paint application.

Spraying

Airless sprayers are commonly used for exterior paint applications because the spraying method allows for a uniform paint application (in terms of thickness) as well as a relatively fast drying time. However, when working with rough siding such as cedar or T-111, the airless spraying method does not allow the paint to absorb into the siding and often results in an inconsistent coverage and eventual paint failure.

At Sisu we bring the best of both methods to your exterior paint job…

To achieve the quality results you’ve come to expect from Sisu, our painters apply the first coat of exterior paint using an airless sprayer followed immediately by back-brushing or back-rolling to assure that the paint is worked evening into the siding surface. They finish with a top coat. This method combines the best of both worlds to achieve the most attractive and longest lasting paint application possible.

Enjoy the sunshine,

Nancy

Best Temperature to Paint a House

Best Temperature to Paint a House

Exterior Painting Home Painting

 

Weather can have both positive and negative effects on your paint job.  When it’s wet and soggy outside, the moisture in the air can slow down the drying process, even on the inside of your home.  If you hire a professional like Sisu Painting, Inc., you won’t need to concern yourself too much because; like all good painters, we are obsessed with the weather.

However, if you have decided to take on a painting project yourself or you feel uneasy about the painter’s you’ve hired, here are a few quick tips to guide you during the painting process.

  1. Read the paint can label and stay within the recommended guidelines for temperature. Not all paint products are created equal, so this is an important factor.
  2. Do not paint exteriors when it’s raining or there is impending rain.
  3. If the forecast is wrong and your paint gets rained on, do not panic.  Although it is not recommended to paint in the rain, most exterior paint products are waterborne, so a light sprinkle is unlikely to damage your paint job.  Almost all exterior paints have drying agents that quicken the drying process, usually skimming over within four hours.  A heavy rain may wash off fresh paint. In that case, you may being doing a bit of touch up painting.  The worst case scenario is that you will have a mess to clean up and need to repaint.
  4. Do not paint when it’s too hot.  If you are painting on a hot day, try painting the shadiest sides of the house to avoid the direct sun. Painting in direct sunlight on a very hot day will not produce the best results.  The paint might dry too fast, become gummy, possibly blister and if you are using an airless sprayer, can dry in the air as the paint is atomizing, before it hits the surface.  A good painter can tell when the paint is drying too quickly and will call it quits.
  5. Do not apply paint products or urethanes on interiors when it is extremely wet and cold.  You could experience bubbling or the product can sag.  This is because the paint or urethane is not drying fast enough.
  6. Avoid painting in the fog; and, a good rule of thumb to follow is to paint only when the air temperature is 5 degrees or more above the dew point.  Weather Underground is a good resource to find out what your current dew point and temperature is for your area.
  7. Heat plus air flow will help your paint dry.  If you are painting inside and having drying issues, turn up the heat and increase the airflow by opening windows or turning on a fan.
  8. Don’t watch your paint dry, I swear it slows down the process!

Now that you have somewhat of a handle on when to paint, don’t let anything stand in the way of your vision and that fabulous paint job!

Cheers!

Nancy Long

 

Metamerism – The Metamorphosis Of Color

Metamerism – The Metamorphosis Of Color

Home Contractors Home Painting Interior Painting

Have you ever chosen the perfect color for your walls at the paint store, only to get home and find that it looks like a completely different color? How about pairing up a paint color to a pillow or other item only to discover it doesn’t match at all once the paint is up on the wall. Or, maybe you painted a room and one of the walls looks like it was painted a different color? All these scenarios are most likely caused by a phenomenon called metamerism.

Following is Wikipedia’s definition of metamerism: In colorimetry, metamerism is the matching of the apparent color of objects without matching the spectral power distributions. Colors that match this way are called metamers.

In the painting world, metamerism describes the effect that light has on color that results in changes to the appearance. If you take a board with paint on it and move it around the room, lay it down or hold it up over your head, the color will change, depending on how the lighting is hitting it. If you leave the board in one spot, you can watch the color change throughout the day as the sun rises and sets.

Metamerism can make choosing a color for your room a challenge. The color might be exactly what you are looking for at 2:32 p.m., but as the sun moves and lighting changes, it may turn drab or go a little too bright. A world without metamerism would be boring and flat, so I appreciate metamers. I enjoy the variations in colors that occur because of lighting.

Most commonly, we run into trouble when we take a paint color and change the sheens. Sheen refers to how flat or shiny the paint is. There are a myriad of sheens, but the most common are flat, eggshell, satin, semi-gloss and high gloss. We generally choose a color based on a paint chip, which is made of ink. Then we choose a sheen and that changes how much light the paint will absorb or reflect. This sheen variation can make it look like the color is different or wrong, when in fact, it is a spot on match.

I hope you have enjoyed this lesson in metamerism and that it helps you to appreciate the ever changing colorful world around us.

Until next time!

Nancy